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Piping and how it is done

Piping and How it is Done

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SHOW STOPPER DESSERTS by The Australian Womens Weekly To see other Cake Cupcake and Baking books click here New softcover book 120 pages gorgeous mouthwatering colour photos and step-by-step instructions Spectacular desserts designed to impress This book is packed with extravagant desserts which have been created to add an element of drama to any dinner party or gathering. Including recipes for spectacular ice cream and chocolate extravaganzas pies tarts puddings and triple-decker cakes Show Stopper Desserts is the must-have book for desserts that look sensational but are not complicated. These recipes will leave your guests wondering 'How did you do it?' Contents include Ice-cream extravaga here

VEGAN PIE IN THE SKY by ISA CHANDRA MOSKOWITZ and TERRY HOPE ROMERO To see other Cupcake and Baking books click here New softcover book over 40 delicious colour photos. Published 20011 224 pages measures 18 x 18 cm. Here is the latest from the reigning queens of vegan baking a cookbook that elevates the latest dessert trend - pies and tarts - to delicious new heights Holidays? Check. Birthdays? Check. Tuesdays? Check! Our research says life is 100% better any day pie is involved. There's nothing like a rich gooey slice of apple pie straight from the oven baked in a perfectly flaky crust and topped with cinnamon-sugar. And now it can be yours along with dozens more mouthwatering varieties veg find out more.....

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FUN and ORIGINAL CHILDRENS' CAKES by MAISIE PARRISH To see other Children's Birthday Cake books click here New softcover book with superb full-colour photos and step-by-step instructions. 128 pages published 2010 This is an adorable collection of children's celebration cakes boasting the unique but easily achievable modelling skills of internationally renowned cake designer and sugarmodeller Maisie Parrish. Each new design has true character and unique charm ideal for a children's party with a difference. Each project is accompanied by quick-to-make cupcakes and minicakes to complement the main cake or to make when time is short. With simple sugarcrafting techniques figure modelling instruct link here

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QUICK MIX CAKES by The Australian Womens Weekly To see other Cake Cupcake and Baking books click here Used softcover book in very good condition 128 pages published 1993. Gorgeous mouthwatering colour photos and step-by-step instructions. If you have lots of ideas but not a lot of time Quick Mix Cakes is the book for you : no-fuss baking with sensational results! From simple sponges and easy loaf cakes to more elaborate creations there are numerous suggestions for easy-to-make cakes with all the inspiration you need for success every time. So if you have 20 minutes in which to whip up the mixture then put it in the oven to cook we have the cake for you! There are also plenty of ideas for sim click to go

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SWEET OLD-TIME FAVOURITES An Australian Women's Weekly Cookbook See more Baking books click here New large softcover book 176 pages lots of delicious recipes and colour photos. These old-fashioned cakes biscuits desserts and sweet treats are perennial favourites - we still order them when we see them on restaurant menus and are delighted when someone makes them for us for dessert or afternoon tea. Bread and butter pudding lemon meringue pie college pudding baked custard - they're all here along with lamingtons neenish tarts coconut macaroons and devil's food cake. These old-time favourites will never go out of fashion. The Australian Women's Weekly has gathered together all their most well-k more.....

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CWA CAKES by The Country Women's Association To see other Cake Cupcake and Baking books click here New softcover book 186pages published 2009. Gorgeous mouthwatering colour photos and step-by-step instructions Traditional tempting tried-and-true The cooking skills of CWA members are legendary and Country Women's Association Cakes includes more than 80 of their recipes for classic country-style food. The cakes range from cheesecakes and sponges for special occasions to tea cakes and fruit loaves for casual afternoon teas. Many are family favourites that have been handed down through generations while others have been passed from friend to friend. All the recipes use simple ingredients and are more info

SOURDOUGH From pastries to gluten-free wholegrain breads by YOKE MARDEWI See more Sourdough bread-making books - click here New large softcover cookbook published 2011 288 pages Following on from the hugely successful Wild Sourdough comes another great cookbook from sourdough specialist Yoke Mardewi. Join the sourdough revolution and learn the art of making sourdough bread pastries loaves and cakes. Yoke’s passion for sourdough has led to her discovery of completely new recipes and techniques for this book including recipes for sourdough croissants pastries gluten-free whole grains soft sourdough rolls and loaves and more. Sourdough includes tips on equipment flours kneading baking sto click

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KIDS' CAKE FAVOURITES An Australian Women's Weekly Cookbook See more Baking books click here New large softcover book published 2011 176 pages lots of delicious colour photos. Nothing brings a smile to your child's face like a magical Australian Women's Weekly birthday cake or a freshly baked muffin in their lunch box. This collection of favourites includes brownies lunchbox slices cupcakes party cakes number cakes and a special 'I-made-it-myself' chapter for any aspiring junior baker. Perfect for a birthday party or school picnic these recipes are easy to follow and guaranteet to satisfy . .Contents include I made it myself - recipes include Butterfly cakes Marble cake Quick-mix chocolate c more information.....

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MAKING WHOOPIES The Official Whoopie Pie Book by NANCY GRIFFIN See other cookbooks click here New softcover book 87 pages published 2010. Making Whoopies is a wide-ranging lighthearted look at whoopie pies and the folks who love them. Making Whoopies contains 16 recipes including healthy gluten-free and zucchini whoopie pies! Whoopie pies could be declared the official Maine dessert and many assert that the rotund chocolate confection originated there although Pennsylvania actually has a an equally strong claim to that honor. No matter - aficionados in both locales never tire of the giant sandwich cookies and the comfort-food treats are enjoying a renaissance as bakeries offer gourmet versio more details.....

POP BAKERY by Clare O'Connell To see other Cake Cupcake and Baking books click here New small hardcover book 64 pages published 2011. Fantastic colour photos and step-by-step instructions. Start cake popping now! If you like cake and you like chocolate then you'll love cake POPs! Billed as the new cupcake these delicious little treats are a cross between a cake and a lollipop: a combination of moist cake and a sweet candy coating moulded onto a lollipop stick and then decorated to create a whole host of characters. Clare O'Connell of the Pop Bakery in London teaches you all you need to know from how to create the cake balls - a mouth-watering mixture of chocolate cake and icing - to dipping lots more

Piping and how it is done
PRACTICE is most important for a beginner. You'll find an upturned cake tin or a sheet of glass ideal for this.
With the glass you can draw guide designs on paper, fix under the glass and pipe the outlines on top.
The icing can be scraped from both tin and glass, put back into the bag and used over and over for practice.
To prepare the bag for icing, attach the pipe to the screw and put about 2 tblspns icing in the bag. Never have too much icing because a very full bag is difficult to handle.
Twist the open ends clock­wise and press well down from the outside with your fingers to squeeze out any air.
Hold the bag with the twist between your first finger and thumb, having your thumb well pressed on the twist to keep the bag closed.
Guide or steady the bag with the tip of the first finger of your left hand. The pressure from your right hand fingers forces the icing out in an even flow.
Practise with the star pipe first, because it's easier to master than the others.

The Star Pipe - With this pipe you can make stars of various sizes, shell edgings, shell scrolls and a basket weave.
For stars, hold the bag in an upright position and lightly touch the tip of the pipe on to the cake.
Press until the star is the size you want and then stop pressure. Lift pipe quickly from cake, otherwise the star will have a long thread.
To do a shell edging or border, hold the bag in a slanting position, apply fairly heavy pressure and, as it forms a shell shape, draw it to the right pull­ing the icing to a point.
For a continuous shell border, begin the next shell, without lifting the pipe from the cake, by piping over the point of the first.Continue this way so that each successive one overlaps.
To make a double shell border for the base of a cake, pipe one shell up on to the cake, the next down on to the board, and so on.

Basket Weave Pipe - You can make various types of weaves with this pipe. It can also be combined with a thick writing pipe or a star pipe to vary the design. In this case, the basket pipe is used for the horizontal lines.
Beginning at the top of the cake and holding the bag in a slanting position, pipe the first line along top of cake.
Next, make vertical lines at regular intervals over this first line and then follow "with another horizontal line. Make sure that this horizontal line covers the ends of the vertical
lines. Pipe the second row of ver­tical lines midway between those in the first vertical row.
Basket weave is done with a basket pipe alone or in combination with a star or writing pipe.

Leaf Pipe - Used for leaves, frilling and it can be used for daffodil petals.
To pipe leaves, hold the bag in a slightly slanting position and let the tip of the pipe (with its broad side to the cake) touch very slightly. Gen­tly press, without moving the pipe, until the icing fans out with the vein mark down the centre.
Now stop pressure and gen­tly pull the pipe down to form the tip of the leaf. Touch cake to break off icing.
Various shaped leaves may be made by twisting your hand to either side while pulling away.
You can make attractive two-tone leaves by putting a spoonful of brown icing in one side of the bag and a spoonful of green in the other. As you squeeze the icing out, the colours combine, giving an in­teresting variegated effect.
For frilling on the skirt of a doll cake, hold the bag side­ways across the cake, apply a steady pressure and move the pipe across the cake in a wavy manner.
Pipe a second row slightly overlapping the first and con­tinue overlapping each successive row until the skirt is completed.

Petal Pipe - This is used tor roses, sweet peas, pansies and most of the flowers used to decorate cakes.

The Writing Pipe - This pipe is used for lattice, scrolls, dots, lines, festoons, bunches of grapes, forget-me-nots, lettering and birds.
For lines, hold the pipe up­right, with the point just touching the cake where the design begins.
Press lightly and evenly and, at the same time, lift the pipe from the cake with a slow, steady movement and draw out a thread of icing to the required length.
Place it in position on the design, touch pipe on to cake, stop pressure and lift off quickly.
If the thread breaks, the icing is being pulled too sharp­ly, so apply more pressure or work a little slower.
To make dots, hold the bag upright and lightly touch the tip of the pipe on the cake.
Press bag until a dot the size required is made. Stop pressure and lift pipe away.
This must be done quickly, or a long peak will form on top of the dot. Graduated dots are made by using heavier or lighter pressure.
For a.scroll design, hold the bag in a slightly slanting posi­tion.
When doing lettering. it's a good idea for beginners to write or print the words on a piece of paper. put on the cake and prick the outlines through with a pin

How to Pipe Flowers, Fruits and Birds
YOU can pipe most flowers on to the waxed side of small pieces of waxed paper arid remove when dry; or you can buy special flower nails and fix these pieces of paper on to them with a spot of royal icing; or you can make your own flower nails by stick­ing unused bottle tops (crown seals) to nails. Use flat-topped nails 2in to 3in long and a strong adhesive.
If piping the flowers directly on to these home-made flower nails, grease lightly with melt­ed white vegetable shortening.
While flowers are drying, stick nails into a board with rows of holes about *in deep bored in it (similar to a crib­bage board).
When flowers are dry, hold each nail over gentle heat (a candle or a match) for a sec­ond to melt the shortening and so remove flowers.
Fix flowers to the cake with a little dab of royal icing. If they're to be on stems, pipe a green dot in the centre back of each and push into this a short piece of wire bent slight­ly at the tip.

You can pipe these on to wire or directly on to the cake. Using a No. 0 or No. 1 writer, begin with a small, elongated dot at the top for a bud.
Pipe two more little dots, side by side, *in further down the stem. Pipe three more tin lower and then another kin down, pipe four pointed dots in a circle.
Repeat, making each group slightly larger than the pre­vious one. With a leaf pipe, pipe an elongated leaf on to waxed paper, making it droop slightly to one side.
If piping directly on to the cake, do a drooping stem first and let it dry before adding the flowers.

You can pipe this flower on to waxed paper and dry over a rolling pin or you can pipe it straight on to the cake.
Using the small petal pipe and holding the bag upright, pipe a thin petal about lin long.
Pipe two more petals, one on either side of the first and overlapping the base.
Pipe three petals for the third row, overlapping the ends of the petals in second row and with the centre one in line with the first petal piped.
Now pipe four petals for the last row, overlapping the ends of those in the previous row. When dry, carefully peel from the paper and arrange on the cake, point end down. Fix with a little royal icing, pipe leaves under the base and add: a few tendrils.

Take a wire stem and, hold­ing it so that the top is point­ing down, pipe small dots through a No. 0 or No. 1 writer. Continue with the dots, turn­ing the wire so that it will be completely covered, and pull­ing each dot to a long down­ward point.
As you continue, overlap and use more pressure on the bag to give a thicker-looking flower head. For the last section, change to a larger writing pipe. Hang each wire stem, with the tip down, to dry.

For these, two colours may be put into the bag or you can tint the flowers with a brush when they're dry.
Use a No. 20 small petal pipe and hold the bag with the concave side of the pipe upper­most and the thick end point­ing down.
Pipe the first petal with the outward and downward move­ment, turn the nail slightly backward and pipe the second petal to overlap the first.
Now turn the nail slightly forward and pipe the third petal which should overlap the first one a little. Turn the nail back a little once again and pipe the fourth petal opposite the third and overlapping the second slightly.
These four petals should form a half circle. Now add the fifth petal, a wavy one, which is the largest and should take up the remaining half circle.
Pipe a spot of contrasting colour in the centre.

This flower has six petals. Pipe the first petal with the out-and-back movement, then the second and third petals. These three should occupy no more than half a circle.
Continue with the next three petals, the last of which should join neatly to the first. Before icing is dry, pinch the end of each petal to give the pointed tip.
When dry, use the smallest petal pipe to make the centre. This can be done in one move­ment.
There are five overlapping petals with an indentation in each. Use a No. 20 small or large petal pipe.
Petals have an edging of pink which shades to white on the inside. Using a knife, line the inside of the bag with pink icing and then fill with white icing.
Pipe the petals with an out­ward and downward move­ment, but pause in the middle of the movement to give the indentation.
Leave until dry and then pipe a circle of yellow or black dots in the centre of each.

Use a No. 20 small or large petal pipe and hold it with the curved part toward you.
With the pipe almost flat on the icing nail, pipe the first petal in a three-quarter circle, shaking the pipe lightly to give the waved effect.       
Pipe the second petal in the same way on top of the first. For the centre, hold the pipe upright and use an up-and-down movement. This petal should stand straight out.

Use a No. 1 or No. 0 writing pipe to make a circle of five small dots for each flower, each dot barely touching the next. Put a little spot of yellow in the centre of each.

Use white or mauve royal icing for these and paint them violet after they're dry, with a dot of yellow in the centre. Hold a No. 20 small petal pipe upright and, using a slight up-and-down movement, pipe two petals on top.
Now pipe two more under those and then a larger petal at the bottom.

Roses can be piped on to flower nails, the sharpened ends of matches or on to wire stems.
You can pipe these on to headless matches, toothpicks, icing nails reversed or on to wire stems.
Make sure the royal icing is fairly stiff before beginning the roses.
Hold the match upright in your left hand, between thumb and first finger, and hold the icing bag in the other hand, in a slanting position, with the concave side of the pipe facing left and the thick end down.
Place the pipe against the match, press the bag and turn the match around slowly, clockwise, so that a strip of icing covers the match and overlaps. Stop pressure and press pipe on to match.
Stand the match in a small hole bored in a piece of wood and go on with the next.
Do about eight of these bud centres at a time and the first one will be nearly dry when you finish.
Now take the first match in your left hand, place the pipe half way up the bud centre and, with a half circle upward movement, pipe a petal half way around the bud centre. Dry as before.
When piping the petals, don't lift the pipe too far away from the match because this will cause folds to form in the petals.
Continue overlapping petals, making each slightly larger until the rose is the size and shape required.
To remove the rose from the match, cut triangles along the edge of a piece of strong card­board. Place the match in a triangle and gently ease the rose off. Leave on cardboard until dry and then store in an airtight container.
If using a left-handed petal pipe, you'll need to reverse the directions.
You can also pipe small rose buds directly on to the cake. For those you use Nos. 1 and 2 writing pipes.
With the No. 2 writer, pipe a pointed bulb and then pipe an "5"-shaped scroll from the pointed tip to the base.
Using green icing and a No. 1 writer, make a small bulb coming from the base and then three small strokes—one in the centre of the bulb and one on either side.

Daffodils can be piped on to icing nails, waxed paper or straight on to wire stems.
There are six petals in each flower and they're piped in the same way as jonquil petals, but you use a leaf pipe for them (you can, of course, use a petal pipe if you wish).
If using a petal pipe, let icing dry slightly and then gently pinch the end of each petal into a point.
For the trumpet, take a writing pipe and pipe a circle of icing in the centre.
Build it up until it's the right height. Before icing is quite dry, you can give the trumpet a serrated edge by nicking it with a pin. When dry, touch up the edge with orange colouring.
Another method is to pipe the flower straight On to a wire (if you want it on a stem).
Bend the top of the wire to form a small hook. Using a small petal or large writing
pipe, pipe a coil of icing around the hook, covering it complete­ly. This is the trumpet part.
When dry, take a No. 16 leaf pipe and pipe three petals in a circle, just behind the trumpet. Put aside to dry and then pipe another three petals behind those, placing them so that they show between the first three.
Yet another method is to pipe the petals on the back of a lightly greased spoon, as­semble when dry and pipe the trumpet part in the centre.

Pipe on to pieces of waxed paper or greaseproof paper lightly greased with melted white vegetable shortening.
Body, head and beak are all in one piece. Using a No. 4 writer or a greaseproof paper cone with a large piece cut from the end, press out icing to form the body the size you want, then lift pipe and, still keeping a slight pressure, form the neck.
Ease pressure to form the head, lower point of pipe a little and draw away quite quickly to form the beak.
The tail is piped on to the body with a No. 0 writer. Pipe three curved strokes on each side of centre of body and build up once to make tail stronger.
Wings: Lightly grease the back of spoons with melted white vegetable shortening—teaspoons or coffee spoons, de­pending on size of doves.
Pipe a single curved line on the back of the spoon.
Fill in on one side with lines, making each one shorter. Re­member to reverse the second wing so there's a right and left wing.
When quite dry, apply gentle heat for a second and carefully remove from spoon.
Remove dove from paper and fix the wings to the body with a little royal icing. Sup­port them until firm. Add a dot of black colouring for each eye.



This little bird can be piped in sections on to waxed paper or the shape can be outlined on the cake and filled in with softened royal icing.
Lightly grease greaseproof paper in the usual way, or use waxed paper.
With a No. 0 or 1 writer, form the wing, using two out and return strokes for the out­side, followed by three out and return strokes, making each one shorter.
For a larger bird, pipe nine out-and-back strokes, the first of which will form the wing shape, then each after that should be gradually shorter. Don't forget to form the second wing in the opposite direction.
For the body. use a No. 1 writer and follow the instruc­tions given for piping the dove.
Pipe the tail on to the bird with a No. 0 or 00 writer, making a long stroke on each side and a short one in the centre.
For the larger bird, use four out-and-return strokes for the tail.
Leave until dry arid then fix wings to body with a little royal icing, supporting them until firm.
Use a spot of black colour­ing for each eye.
Another method is to pipe the tail first and, without lift­ing the pipe, continue to press out the icing to form the body, head and beak. Make the wings separately.
To pipe the bird directly on to the cake, first draw the shape on to paper. Place paper on cake, prick through the outline and flood with the softened royal icing.

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